V is for Video Exercises

V is for Video Exercises

This is the first of two posts about video. The first is looking at the exercise types we write for existing videos and the second will look at writing video scripts. Once we have either chosen the video we want to work with (perhaps something on YouTube) or a video...
B is for Business English

B is for Business English

BESIG Every year, the Business English Special Interest Group (BESIG) of IATEFL organizes its conference. I’ve attended many of them over the last 30 years and I’m looking forward to the event in Stuttgart on November 2nd. It’s a chance to share...
V is for voice

V is for voice

Finding your voice Some years ago, in a conversation with the ELT author Ceri Jones, Ceri referred to the ‘voice’ of her materials. She stressed the need to establish the right kind of ‘voice’ (or ‘tone’) when writing instructions (also called ‘rubrics’). For example,...
H is for Homework

H is for Homework

Do ELT writers write homework tasks? Yes! Sometimes we do, especially for Young Learners and teenagers. Some publishers or Ministries of Education produce a Homework booklet. Sometimes they are accessed online. In some cases homework is part of a conscious effort to...
H is for Heads-up and heads-down

H is for Heads-up and heads-down

Visualizing your materials in the classroom When we write a series of exercises for a complete lesson, for example, in the form of a worksheet, it’s easy to become engrossed in how it works on the page or screen. However, it’s more important to visualize...